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EXPLORE NORTHEASTERN

Arun Bansil

University Distinguished Professor

Mailing Address:

111 DA (Dana Research Center), Boston, MA 02115

Office Address:

214 DA (Dana Research Center), Boston, MA 02115

Expertise:

  • 2d and Layered Materials, Angel-resolve, Compton Scattering, Computational Physics, First-principles Electronic Structure Calculations, Inelastic X-ray Scattering, Other Highly Resolved Spectroscopies, Photoemission, Positron Annihilation, Scanning-tunneling, Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, topological materials

Publications:

Bansil is a University Distinguished Professor in physics at Northeastern University (NU). He served for over two years at the US Department of Energy managing the flagship Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics program (2008-10). He is an academic editor of the international Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids (1994-), the founding director of NU’s Advanced Scientific Computation Center (1999-), and serves on various international editorial boards and commissions. He has authored/co-authored over 398 technical articles and 18 volumes of conference proceedings covering a wide range of topics in theoretical condensed matter and materials physics, and a major book on X-Ray Compton Scattering (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2004). Bansil is a Highly Cited Researcher (ISI Web of Science/Clarivate Analytics; 2017, 2018).

Arun Bansil in the news

This Exotic Crystal Is Fueling the Quantum Revolution

Bismuth was long thought to be an ordinary metallic crystal, but groundbreaking research by physics professor Arun Bansil and his colleagues predicts it is in fact a highly efficient topological insulator, and it could be the answer to building supercomputers that don't overheat.

What if superconductors could work at room temperature?

In a paper published recently in Communications Physics, a Nature publication, Bansil and his colleagues describe a discovery that brings us closer to that elusive feat—what he described as the “holy grail” of the field. For the first time, researchers were able to model the behavior of electrons, which are responsible for superconductors’ ability to conduct electricity.