Mark Prokosch

Senior Lecturer
Location: 125 NI (Nightingale Hall), Boston, MA 02111

Area(s) of Expertise

  • Evolutionary Psychology, Psychobiology

About

My research background is in evolutionary psychology. I am most interested in the integration of ultimate and proximate explanations of human social cognitive traits. My specific work focuses on human mate preferences, ovulatory effects, & individual differences in psychometric intelligence, creativity, & other conspicuous behavioral displays. I teach several undergraduate…

My research background is in evolutionary psychology. I am most interested in the integration of ultimate and proximate explanations of human social cognitive traits. My specific work focuses on human mate preferences, ovulatory effects, & individual differences in psychometric intelligence, creativity, & other conspicuous behavioral displays.

I teach several undergraduate courses offered by the department including Foundations of Psychology, Inquiries in Psychological Science, Seminar in Social Psychology, and Seminar in Biological Psychology. I also teach the Honors Foundations of Psychology course offered through the University Honors Program.

My teaching interests can be categorized into the following:

  1. Neuroscience — evolutionary, social cognitive, behavioral, & neuro-endocrinology, pharmacology & pathology.
  2. Hominin evolution — adaptationist perspectives of behavior, life history traits, comparative primate social cognition, moral reasoning & behavior, comparative neurobiology, sexual selection & mate preferences, genomic imprinting, Darwinian medicine, brain evolution & uniqueness in the human genome, & complexity science & emergence.
  3. Individual variation in behavior — genetic & epigenetic regulation of neural development, prenatal environmental effects, infant social intuitions, attachment & social influences on neuroplasticity, dispositional and contextual factors, memory, person perception, substance use, psychometric intelligence, & mate preferences.
  4. Mindfulness & contemplative practices — contemplative neuroscience, Buddhist psychology (vipassana and metta practices), default mode, automaticity & self-projection, & mindfulness based cognitive therapy.