2018 Graduates

Tommy Chen

Tommy Chen

“I am really thankful for the opportunities that Northeastern University has provided for me and the wonderful professors and advisors who have assisted me along the way throughout my time here. I hope to pursue a career in medicine and plan on applying to medical school in the near future.”
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Chung

Joseph Chung

“I don’t know where I would be without Northeastern’s co-op program. I’ve always imagined I’d end up somewhere in the life sciences field, however, through my past three co-ops, I was able to truly understand what I was passionate about and envisioned myself doing. I was fortunate enough to develop a strong foundation during my first co-op at Pfizer in the Rare Disease research unit. Through that initial experience, I quickly soaked in a lot of what the biotech industry had to offer thanks to an invested mentor. Additionally, I was able to present my work during RISE:2016 here at Northeastern and was blessed to receive an award in the Undergraduate Physical and Life Sciences category. I think that was a pivotal moment during my college career when I knew this was something I wanted to immerse myself in. My second co-op was, again, at Pfizer, but this time in the Neuroscience department working on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s research. That was a completely different experience since, evidently, it was neuroscience-based and something I’ve never done before. My third and last experience is at Jounce Therapeutics, a small/medium biotech exploring novel immunotherapy in cancer research. Luckily, I’m still there now part-time as I finish up my degree, but through the diverse co-ops I’ve experienced from the various research fields to the contrasting work environments, I’m forever grateful for Northeastern’s immersive co-op program. Beyond co-op, I’m also very passionate about cultural awareness and creating inclusive communities. I’ve been a part of the executive boards of the cultural fraternity Pi Delta Psi and the Korean American Student Association. Additionally, I’ve been a member of the Pan Asian American Council, Multicultural Greek Council, and the College of Science Student Diversity Council.”
 
 
 
Anusha Din

Anusha Din

“My time at Northeastern can be described as a diverse experience. I was exposed to different types of workplaces through my co-ops and directed study on campus. One at an academic lab at the Leibniz Universitat Hannover in Germany and the next in an industrial setting in Quality Control at Sanofi Genzyme. I was able to take a range of classes that not only increased my technical STEM skills and electives that made me think outside the scope of science. I found my passion and built leadership skills through Colleges Against Cancer and Relay For Life clubs. Last but not least, I found lifelong friends and mentors with NU UTSAV. All these different experiences shaped my experience and influenced my future plans. I will be working as a Research Assistant in the Newborn Medicine department at Boston Children’s Hospital and hope to maintain all the connections I have been able to make.”
 
 
 
Rucha Gor

Rucha Gor

“My time at Northeastern University flew by as I engaged myself in extracurriculars, two co-ops and wonderful memories. I was an active member of UTSAV South Asian Organization for four years, where I was able to immerse in cultural performances and events that allowed me to connect deeply to my heritage. I was also a part of New England Bhangra Club, a competitive dance team on campus that took me all over the country to compete. While my team gave me the chance to explore my passion for dance, my co-ops gave me the chance to explore various careers in science. My first co-op was conducting Alzheimer’s research at the Hyman Lab at Mass General Hospital, while my second co-op was as a rehab aide at Performance Physical Therapy, an outpatient clinic outside Boston. I never would have been able to dabble in such different career paths on my own; I can’t thank Northeastern enough for the opportunities it has given me, and I can’t wait to see where the future takes me next!”
 
 
 
Rachel Gross

Rachel Gross

“My experiences as a BNS undergraduate at Northeastern University have been integral in directing me towards my interests, my future, and have helped me learn who I am as a person. My undergraduate co-ops included Clinical Research Coordinator at New England Baptist Hospital, followed by EMT at Cataldo Ambulance. My co-ops truly enabled me to discover my strengths, as well as my passion for helping others through the medical field. Post-graduation, I am currently employed as a Clinical Research Assistant for Pulmonary Research at Boston Children’s Hospital, and I plan to pursue my passion by going through medical school to become a physician.”
 
 
 

Joe Zaki, Terrence Lee, and Natasha Mathur

Terrence Lee

“Studying neuroscience at Northeastern was a great choice because my interests range across disciplines. The field includes researchers from biology, physics, and beyond. Collaboration is essential when studying systems as complex as the brain. Each person frames the problem differently, which allows us to collectively ask better questions. In my three co-ops, I have had the opportunity to work with scientists from across the world, each with their own story. However, all of us were similar in our fascination with nature and our desire to understand it.
On campus, the neuroscience community has been good to me. I have made some life-long friends through attending class and participating in clubs. The faculty here are also very supportive of their students. I am personally indebted to professors Richard Melloni and Lesley Ricci for letting me come into their lab as a newbie and mentoring me throughout my time at Northeastern. Graduation is rapidly approaching, and I’m left wondering where the time went and what will come next in my life.
Nevertheless, understanding a little bit about human biology and behavior will be useful no matter where I go.”
 
 
 
Anna Li

Anna Li

“The range of opportunities at Northeastern has allowed me to explore different avenues of neuroscience careers, even as an undergraduate. When I began as a freshman, I was overwhelmed by the breadth of choices that I could make. My first research experience was in the Shansky Lab right here at Northeastern, which fostered my interest in the scientific process and community. I went on to a co-op position with the Histed Lab at the National Institute of Mental Health, where I learned how neuroscience research is intertwined with engineering and computer science. These experiences solidified my decision to graduate early and jump into research. After graduation, I’ll be returning to my co-op at NIMH as a post-bac, after which I’ll apply to computational neuroscience PhD programs.”
 
 
 
Tiana Mason

Tiana Mason

“Northeastern University afforded me countless opportunities through which to learn, engage, and grow. While navigating the wide array of courses offered to Behavioral Neuroscience majors broadly spanning the fields of biology, psychology, and neuroscience, I was able to delve into new fields while also becoming more knowledgeable in areas I already enjoyed. Due to my interest in civic engagement I geared my higher-level courses, and much of my coursework, towards a career in psychiatry and public health. I was able to complete three co-ops with three extremely different focuses over the course of 4.5 years. I completed preclinical, pharmacological research as part of the Behavior Core at Pfizer, worked independently as an intern for a clinical psychologist, and spent eight months as a Mental Health Associate at Arbour [Psychiatric] Hospital. Arbour was my most transformative experience as I became familiar interacting with people from diverse backgrounds and with varying degrees of mental illness. As an active member within the Center of Community Service on campus, my co-op experiences also greatly influenced the types of service I engaged in throughout my years at NU. An overwhelming percentage of my patients at Arbour experienced or were currently experiencing homelessness, therefore I work mostly with community partners that benefit these populations. The culmination of my time here has led to the decision to take two years off to gain experience in the public health sector and join the Peace Corp before pursuing a Master of Public Health.”
 
 
 
Natasha Mathur

Natasha Mathur

“Northeastern University and the Behavioral Neuroscience program have provided me with many incredible opportunities to further develop my scientific career and myself. Through my co-ops in the Datta Lab at Harvard Medical School, I was able to conduct research focused on better understanding the neural circuits involved in the olfactory system. I was also able to design my own research project, conducted experiments, and analyzed data culminating in my Honors Thesis. I was also able to work in the Belfer Institute at Dana Farber and focus on the clinical applications to cancer research. As co-president of NEURONS, I was able to plan events and engage with neuroscientists in the local Boston area while interacting with and mentoring younger members of the BNS community. I also formed bonds with my Boston community, while volunteering at MGH and shadowing a physician at Boston Children’s Hospital, resulting in publishing a first author case study on a patient I saw. These experiences have helped me to develop my critical thinking skills, become well-acquainted with new scientific technologies, and discover the importance of being a respectful and compassionate scientist/physician.”
 
 
 
Claire Peterson

Claire Peterson

“The Northeastern co-op program allowed me to pursue my love of neuroscience within premiere institutions across the US. For my first co-op, I relocated to Ashburn, VA, where I spent six months conducting research in a computational neuroscience lab with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) at Janelia Research Campus. During my time at HHMI, I became interested in data science and statistical analysis from my work. At Janelia, I used software to create 3D neural wiring diagrams and go on to present this research at the Society for Neuroscience conference in San Diego. My experience at HHMI pushed me to pursue a research in an epidemiology lab at Mclean Hospital, where I continued research within the field of neuroscience, and presented the methods of the Harvard Football Player Health Study at Mclean Research Day. My time at Northeastern has allowed me to explore my passions, develop as a student, and a professional within the scientific field.”
 
 
 
Nina Tamashunas

Nina Tamashunas

“My education at Northeastern University has allowed me to not only flourish academically, but also professionally, through my research on campus, Dialogue of Civilizations, time as Resident Assistant, and two co-ops. My Dialogue of Civilization took me to England and Ireland, where I learned about global mindfulness and wellness in the context of my life and in the lives of others. Working in Dr. Greg Miller’s interdisciplinary lab for over two years taught me how to adopt a forward-thinking mindset, foster interdisciplinary collaboration, approach problems from multiple avenues, and develop sound research methodology. I continued my research endeavors at both of my co-ops. First, I worked at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Lab at Tufts University, exploring ways nutrition and exercise impact physical functioning as we age. Here, I was offered the great opportunity of working with geriatric patients from a variety of backgrounds. I completed my second co-op in the Ophthalmology Department at Boston Medical Center, where I worked on numerous single-site and multi-site clinical studies. Working with the diverse and unique patient population that Boston Medical Center serves has inspired me to continue to learn about how to mitigate social determinants of medicine. Reflecting back, I will take the skills and knowledge I have learned from all my experiences at Northeastern to medical school next year at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.”
 
 
 
Joe Zaki

Joe Zaki

“Northeastern stands at a unique position to offer students substantial real-world experience through its co-op program, and many students benefit from it—I surely have. In my time at Northeastern, I have worked in academic research laboratories at Harvard Medical School, Tufts Medical Center, Harvard University, and Boston University, under the guidance of thoughtful mentors who have fostered my growth as a neuroscientist. It was largely through these mentors that I have prepared to pursue a career in neuroscience, as I will hereafter begin a PhD program in neuroscience in the Fall of 2018.

But I owe my development as a neuroscientist to more than just the co-op program. Northeastern’s BNS program has worked tirelessly to maintain a curriculum that teaches what is at the frontiers of neuroscience, through the addition of new material to existing courses and the development of new courses altogether. It has been the interdisciplinary nature of the BNS program, along with a computer science minor, that has allowed me to integrate numerous schools of thought into one eclectic view of neuroscience research. It is with this formidable skill set and mindset that I confidently transition into graduate study.”