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EXPLORE NORTHEASTERN

Academics

A deep understanding of biological principles, as well as innovative advances in the biomedical and life sciences, are essential for addressing major challenges that our world faces in health, security and sustainability. Northeastern Biology students will become leaders in these efforts as they learn to create and apply new knowledge, and build their scientific and technical skillsets, by seamlessly integrating experiential learning, challenging coursework, and closely mentored scientific discovery in the biological sciences.

A male and female student prep to pipette solutions at the lab bench.

Undergraduate

Undergraduate studies in the Department of Biology allow students the opportunity to develop a basic understanding of the organization and the processes of life, from the level of molecules and cells through the level of organs and organ systems to the level of populations, species, eco-systems and evolution.

Slava Epstein and students talking in a lab

Graduate

Graduate study in the Department of Biology provides a tailored experience for each student, including independent research in our major areas of strength: molecular microbiology, cell and molecular biology, aging and regenerative biology, and biomechanics, neurobiology and behavior.

News

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Tapping into the Power of Mitochondria

Dr. Dori Woods and her associates at Northeastern University recent research about the nature and behavior of mitochondria could one day be used to better understand cell function as a…
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Iron: The Swiss Army Knife for Bacteria

Dr. Yunrong Chai and his team discovered new, essential uses for iron in biofilms, the bacterial populations that colonize our bodies, our hospitals, and our world.
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This image of Li’s model shows each cell’s possible individual properties that lead to overall mechanical heterogeneity in the tissue. Photo provided by Xinzhi Li

Cancer Tumors Aren’t Always as ‘Tough’ as They Seem

Ph.D. student Xinzhi Li and Assistant Physics Professor Max Bi applied a model to study the rigidity of cancer tumors to help researchers understand how to treat them.
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