Academics

A deep understanding of biological principles, as well as innovative advances in the biomedical and life sciences, are essential for addressing major challenges that our world faces in health, security and sustainability. Northeastern Biology students will become leaders in these efforts as they learn to create and apply new knowledge, and build their scientific and technical skillsets, by seamlessly integrating experiential learning, challenging coursework, and closely mentored scientific discovery in the biological sciences.

A male and female student prep to pipette solutions at the lab bench.

Undergraduate

Undergraduate studies in the Department of Biology allow students the opportunity to develop a basic understanding of the organization and the processes of life, from the level of molecules and cells through the level of organs and organ systems to the level of populations, species, eco-systems and evolution.

Slava Epstein and students talking in a lab

Graduate

Graduate study in the Department of Biology provides a tailored experience for each student, including independent research in our major areas of strength: molecular microbiology, cell and molecular biology, aging and regenerative biology, and biomechanics, neurobiology and behavior.

News

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Michael Mallouh talks with another person while standing in front of a scientific poster.

Q&A: Schafer scholarship recipient and aspiring oncologist paves own way at Northeastern

Meet Michael Mallouh, fourth year biology major, psychology minor, and on the pre-med track and hear about his research experiences as an undergraduate including the Schafer Co-op Scholarship.
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Dispatches from an Antarctic co-op: Station Living

A new update from Jake Grondin, a current co-op in the Detrich lab at Palmer Station in Antarctica, detailing life at Palmer Station.
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This tropical disease is second only to Malaria as a parasitic killer. So why haven’t you heard of it?

The deadly strain of leishmaniasis infects 300,000 people annually, causing 20,000 deaths, and is the second largest cause of parasitic death after malaria. For two Northeastern professors, Richard Wamai and…
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